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post a fact about beer.

the_undead

Jackets & Baseball/Soccer Mod
^ ditto. madpuck, maybe you should go again, and the two of us can join. :)

its such a travesty that you dont even really drink beer and you went to oktoberfest.

fact: if you put a mouse in an empty beer bottle, you can get a free case of elsinore beer.
 

madpuck

Legend
^ ditto. madpuck, maybe you should go again, and the two of us can join. :)

its such a travesty that you dont even really drink beer and you went to oktoberfest.

fact: if you put a mouse in an empty beer bottle, you can get a free case of elsinore beer.
Yeah and I was only 14 at the time, quite the eye opener going to Oktoberfest and taking a trip through the Red Light District in Amsterdam..
 

Cheech

Sharks & Golf Forum Moderator
Beer brewing dates to almost 6000 BC. However, it was the Sumerians around 2000 BC who really loved the stuff. Their plaques and carvings often center on people or gods drinking from large jars of beer. A hymn to one of their most important goddesses, Ninkasi, is actually a very detailed explanation of how to make beer; this was helpful in a society that was almost entirely illiterate. Want to make some beer but can’t read the recipe? Just start reciting the hymn and you’re set. Beer was so important that the average Sumerian couldn’t be bothered to stop drinking it for anything apparently, as there is a carving of a woman drinking out of a beer jug in the middle of sexual intercourse. That’s some dedication to your booze.
 

LJG

Active member
I believe Hammurabi's code had something about a death penalty for brewing bad beer. Man, if he had ever tatsted some of the big horses in the US...
 

Veca

Mod Squad
:cheers2: Beer is yummy. With all the yeast, hops and grains that it's made from, it's a real health food!!!!:cheers2::cheers2:
 

lecoqsportif

Active member
Beer brewing dates to almost 6000 BC. However, it was the Sumerians around 2000 BC who really loved the stuff. Their plaques and carvings often center on people or gods drinking from large jars of beer. A hymn to one of their most important goddesses, Ninkasi, is actually a very detailed explanation of how to make beer; this was helpful in a society that was almost entirely illiterate. Want to make some beer but can’t read the recipe? Just start reciting the hymn and you’re set. Beer was so important that the average Sumerian couldn’t be bothered to stop drinking it for anything apparently, as there is a carving of a woman drinking out of a beer jug in the middle of sexual intercourse. That’s some dedication to your booze.
Some have argued it was beer production that triggered urbanization. Grainaries...

Might be bullshit. But I'll buy it.
 

BURG

Mod Squad
Huge beer price hike brewin'

By MARKUS ERMISCH, QMI Agency

CALGARY - First pump prices, then coffee prices, now beer prices!

Where does it stop?

That's a question price-conscious Canadians are likely to ask themselves as the pressure is on for beer prices to rise.

When prices will rise remains to be seen, but rise they will if barley prices are any indication. So better drink up now, because next year it'll most likely cost you more.

"Obviously, when the costs of your inputs increase, it's going to put a strain on your bottom line," said Andre Fortin, spokesman of the Brewers Association of Canada. "So the increase in the cost of barley is something that's very concerning to breweries across the country."

It should be concerning for thirsty consumers as well, because higher costs are usually passed on to them in the form of higher prices at the local pub or liquor store.

Barley, along with labour and aluminium (for beer cans), is one of the main costs for the makers of the frosty fermentations.

And its price has shot up steeply this year because of poor harvests in Canada and Australia, two of the world's main growers of malting barley.

In fact, Canada's barley crop last fall was so bad the country couldn't export any barley at all, said Lorelle Selinger, manager of barley marketing and sales at the Wheat Board.

In other words, the market is tight and squeezing up prices.

A metric tonne of malting barley, which in the current crop year is costing $253, would cost $337 in the coming crop year, says Wheat Board data. That's a difference of one-third.

Selinger said that even if the harvest this year will be plentiful, barley prices are likely to rise.

And that means beer prices will rise, too. The only question is when.

Large breweries, like Molson Coors Canada, have many of their supply prices locked into long-term contracts and are shielded until these contracts expire.

"Short-term fluctuations don't impact us whatsoever," said spokesman Adam Moffat, noting that the length of the contracts depend on individual suppliers.

Large breweries also have more clout in negotiations with their suppliers, simply because they have more buying power. That's not the case for smaller breweries.

Still, Ravinder Minhas, co-owner of Calgary-based Minhas Creek Brewing Co., says he'll keep prices steady.

"We're going to hold on beer prices," he said. "We're going to try and absorb the cost and try to hold the line for as long as we can."

Minhas said that by following this strategy, he hopes to grow his brewery's market share, as other companies raise their prices.

markus.ermisch@sunmedia.ca
 
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