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OT: Coronavirus Resources - and other things to not worry about

Preston

AKA: Preston Fauci. Prestauci.
Thread on booster data...



Too good to ignore now. This is a 3 dose vaccine. After that we wait to see how quickly protection wanes from there. If we can maintain strong protection (80+%?) for a year and settle with annual boosters I think we're looking at a pandemic ender if we vaccinate enough people (however long that takes). Lower prevalence means slower rate of mutation of the virus too which is an added benefit.


Hey Canada, might want to look at this data.
 

AP79

Active member
Wouldn't it be great if the UK could fucking stop causing so many mutations? Why the fuck are these people so nonchalant about this shit...
 

Wayward DP

Well-known member
Thread on booster data...



Too good to ignore now. This is a 3 dose vaccine. After that we wait to see how quickly protection wanes from there. If we can maintain strong protection (80+%?) for a year and settle with annual boosters I think we're looking at a pandemic ender if we vaccinate enough people (however long that takes). Lower prevalence means slower rate of mutation of the virus too which is an added benefit.


Hey Canada, might want to look at this data.
@NACI !!!
 

Preston

AKA: Preston Fauci. Prestauci.

Two studies — one published in Nature Reviews Microbiology in September and the other currently under review — show one of four flu viruses that infect humans each year hasn't been detected anywhere in the world since April 2020.

So does that mean it's gone for good? It's still too early to say.

There is a chance this particular virus — the Yamagata virus — might be lurking in a pocket of the world somewhere, according to Ian Barr, deputy director of the World Health Organization's Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Doherty Institute, and co-author of one of the studies.

"It may re-emerge, but we haven't had a single detection of that virus in 18 months.
 

anne25

Well-known member
It could be awhile before Boosters are available to the general public. But I’ll be ready and willing to get in line for a booster if or when they are recommended.

I found this article quite interesting.



Antibodies, your first line of defence against COVID-19 infection, do decline — and may even be doing so as you're reading this — but that's not unexpected.


While one aspect of your vaccine-induced immunity to COVID-19 is technically "waning" in the weeks and months after vaccination, that's not necessarily a bad thing — because it's not your immune system's only form of protection against the virus.

"I don't even like the term," said University of Toronto immunologist Jennifer Gommerman. "And the reason I don't like the term is that it implies that the immune response in its entirety is declining."


It's "entirely normal" for antibody levels to drop initially after vaccination and your immune response to the virus to become "contracted" over time, she said. But your body is also creating "highly efficient" memory B cells to fight off COVID-19 long term.

B cells work quickly to generate large quantities of antibodies in the weeks after vaccination, but they typically produce more effective antibodies as time goes on, helping sharpen the long-term response to a virus.


So while reports of waning immunity may sound concerning, that initial decrease in antibody levels may also be necessary in the fight against COVID-19, as it helps fine-tune the immune system's plan of attack.
 

lecoqsportif

Well-known member
These clowns.

Clueless hubris and performative defiance syndrome is killing people.

I hope they enjoy their “culture”, whatever the fuck that is.
 

mbow30

Well-known member
that's a pretty pathetic article.

did the study control for the drop in efficacy of the vaccines between december and august? it's a very different picture to compare somebody infected in august vs somebody who received the vaccine in january. what about type of vaccine received? we know that AZ's starting point has lower efficacy and a faster drop than mRNA varieties. how might that have impacted the data? and what about how your immunity from prior infection might wane over time?

no discussion on confidence intervals or standard deviations.

they mention that your risk of testing positive with infection is still lower with the vaccine but not how much lower... that's a pretty important bit of data.

it's also downright irresponsible to not mention the fact that one form of protection has a worst case scenario, for the vast majority of cases, of a bad flu, while the other form of protection poses a significant risk of hospitalization or even death.

like... if you catch measles you have better immunity than from the vaccine. but you get the fucking vaccine because you don't fucking want measles.
 

Preston

AKA: Preston Fauci. Prestauci.
"What doesn't kill you makes you very very weak."

Early reinfection data on severity doesn't look too encouraging and I'm thinking it has a lot to do with our bodies not being capable of handling two bouts of covid. It ain't easy on the body. So getting vaccinated might be the wise choice.
 
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