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OT: The M-Fing Food Thread

Habspatrol

Administrator
Staff member
My experiments have been trying to find the burger bun substitute. Cabbage, kale, chard, etc. I've been doing for a few years is getting old.

It was a 50/50 with the almond flour. It held okay on my burg but not the significant others'.
My wife makes awesome low carb " buns.

They have almond flour but they're great for burgers and such. I asked her to forward the recipe to me.

They're great and went to the next level when we got a 4" silicone mould for them. It allows them to keep their form so that they are thicker.

"Keto Fat Head Buns:

*2 TBS of cream cheese
*1 1/2 cups of cheddar or mozzarella cheese
*1 egg
*1 TSP baking powder
*3/4 cup almond flour

Soften the cream cheese (I usually just throw it in the microwave). They say to then mix it with the other cheese. I just throw everything else in and blend it with a hand mixer. Line a baking sheet with wax paper (parchment paper). Then form round balls (blobs) of your dough ... Sized to your liking. I usually take the above recipe and multiply it by 4. I make decent size buns, and multiplying the recipe by 4 gives me 12 buns. I have made them with just cheddar ... And a mix of the cheddar and mozzarella. Never just mozzarella yet. The cheddar tends to give it more flavor. Like our friend said, "It tastes like a giant cheez-it."

I bake them at 350 for 20 minutes, or until slightly browned on the top."
 

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MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
I was checking out this local guy's Insta because he delivers homemade bagels and pastrami...and I noticed he has an insta story about smoked brisket that spends 72 hours in sous vide.

His insta handle is Daniel Seidman and the Story is called SV Brisket.

I watched that, and watched one of SVE's old videos on doing brisket sous vide and neither of those has the texture that I would expect out of slow cooked brisket. IMO 130 isn't high enough. 72 hours and you should be pulling it apart, the slices should be very soft.

Ballistic BBQ's method (24 hrs at 155) is probably the way judging from the way the results look on video. Brisket isn't supposed to look like roast beef. I'm still not sure about the benefit of the extra time spend aside from the culinary flexing.
 
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BeLeafer

Well-known member
This guy is quite the deal -- $30 Barolo. Got a case to split with a friend. Had dim expectations at that price but unreal value. Most will go in the cellar but very drinkable.




I've been using this vivino service recently. They deliver from Alberta and it takes about a week. Nicely packaged. Lots of good wines you won't find at the lcbo.
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
No, just perfer to find healthy solution.


Just tested my chaffle for a burger, and added a degree of difficulty. Put the burger on the bottom chaffle before I made the crown, I wanted to make sure that it could withstand burger grease the way a decent bun does for a few minutes. Did an excellent job, highly suggest

*makes 2
-50g low moisture mozzarella
-40g almond flour
-1 large egg
-I didn't measure the spice blend that I used (only a few grams total), but again to try to neutralize the sweetish flavour of the almond flour I assed salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, mustard powder. Less is more here.
-10-15ml of 18% cream (approx, the idea is the get the batter something more similar in consistency to proper belgian waffle batter...add more as necessary, sub out for a lower fat content dairy product if that's your bag, I'm going to try an almond milk version eventually)
- About a gram of xanthum gum as a binder. If you're not comfortable with xanthum, feel free to source free range potato or no net arrowroot or tapioca starch as a thickening agent
- Waffle maker on high. As high as possible...if it goes to 11, set it at 11.
- Spray or brush on the oil of your choice, trying to get a little bit of crustyness out of the edges here
- Cook your chaffle batter like 2-3 minutes longer than you think you should. My entire theory behind this is that we can't mimix the way that bread rises, but we can mimic how it toasts. The additional moisture from the cream allows for the batter to spread better (wider, less dense chaffle) but also allows for there to be two very different textures (crust & crumb, almost) if you let the surface cook for long enough

I found the normal chaffles to be like trying to eat things on an almond flour muffin. Bad texture for putting anything on it really.

Just held up to chaffle burgers with toppings (again placed on the bottom "bun" to test it). I might do some more food science digging to see if there's something I'm not thinking of or don't know about as further improvement, but as is these were easily the best I've seen after trying a bunch of different online recipes
 

BeLeafer

Well-known member
Just tested my chaffle for a burger, and added a degree of difficulty. Put the burger on the bottom chaffle before I made the crown, I wanted to make sure that it could withstand burger grease the way a decent bun does for a few minutes. Did an excellent job, highly suggest

*makes 2
-50g low moisture mozzarella
-40g almond flour
-1 large egg
-I didn't measure the spice blend that I used (only a few grams total), but again to try to neutralize the sweetish flavour of the almond flour I assed salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, mustard powder. Less is more here.
-10-15ml of 18% cream (approx, the idea is the get the batter something more similar in consistency to proper belgian waffle batter...add more as necessary, sub out for a lower fat content dairy product if that's your bag, I'm going to try an almond milk version eventually)
- About a gram of xanthum gum as a binder. If you're not comfortable with xanthum, feel free to source free range potato or no net arrowroot or tapioca starch as a thickening agent
- Waffle maker on high. As high as possible...if it goes to 11, set it at 11.
- Spray or brush on the oil of your choice, trying to get a little bit of crustyness out of the edges here
- Cook your chaffle batter like 2-3 minutes longer than you think you should. My entire theory behind this is that we can't mimix the way that bread rises, but we can mimic how it toasts. The additional moisture from the cream allows for the batter to spread better (wider, less dense chaffle) but also allows for there to be two very different textures (crust & crumb, almost) if you let the surface cook for long enough

I found the normal chaffles to be like trying to eat things on an almond flour muffin. Bad texture for putting anything on it really.

Just held up to chaffle burgers with toppings (again placed on the bottom "bun" to test it). I might do some more food science digging to see if there's something I'm not thinking of or don't know about as further improvement, but as is these were easily the best I've seen after trying a bunch of different online recipes
Cream is something I haven't tried. I'll give this a shot. I'm a 35% cream guy though, lol.
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
Cream is something I haven't tried. I'll give this a shot. I'm a 35% cream guy though, lol.

For most cooking applications, yeah same. I get funny looks from people when I suggest 35% though. Most people think whipping cream = whipped cream and don't have the faintest **** that it's not sweet.

If we just called it whole cream or double cream like in the US & UK, I think more people would know wtf it is.
 

BeLeafer

Well-known member
For most cooking applications, yeah same. I get funny looks from people when I suggest 35% though. Most people think whipping cream = whipped cream and don't have the faintest **** that it's not sweet.

If we just called it whole cream or double cream like in the US & UK, I think more people would know wtf it is.
Somewhat funny story on a cottage trip last summer. We were all quite pale from the night before and buddy puts a big glug of my cream in his coffee and nearly sprayed everyone at the picnic table -- 'wtf, man!' lol.
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
Somewhat funny story on a cottage trip last summer. We were all quite pale from the night before and buddy puts a big glug of my cream in his coffee and nearly sprayed everyone at the picnic table -- 'wtf, man!' lol.

35% in your coffee?

I used 35% for as many reasonable purposes as I can think of (I make my own butter pretty regularly, so always have 35% kicking around) and I've used it in coffee when I'm out of everything else, but man, I don't like it.
 

trujaysfan

Well-known member
Biggest smoke ive ever done is happening today. 4 turkey breasts, 80 chicken wings and 10 chicken thighs (all bone in).

Rub: cajun, granulated garlic, hot chili powder, smoked Spanish paprika (sweet), smoked Spanish paprika (hot), cumin, salt, guajillo pepper powder and habanero powder.

Mop sauce to get the skin crispy: butter, garlic salt and habanero salt.

Ill see how this turns out.

Apple wood for the smoke
 

Volcanologist

Well-known member
over at bro's and we got some Roti Mahal again last night

first a delicious veggie samosa. nice flaky pastry and not too greasy

then Madras curry roti. heavenly.

after an intermission hash break, then comes a chilled mango Lassi for dessert.

then the Leafs rest their balls on Vancouver's chin.

good night.
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
Biggest smoke ive ever done is happening today. 4 turkey breasts, 80 chicken wings and 10 chicken thighs (all bone in).

Rub: cajun, granulated garlic, hot chili powder, smoked Spanish paprika (sweet), smoked Spanish paprika (hot), cumin, salt, guajillo pepper powder and habanero powder.

Mop sauce to get the skin crispy: butter, garlic salt and habanero salt.

Ill see how this turns out.

Apple wood for the smoke

Noice. Apple is a good choice there. Hickory or even competition blend would compete a bit more briskly with all of that seasoning.
 

BeLeafer

Well-known member
35% in your coffee?

I used 35% for as many reasonable purposes as I can think of (I make my own butter pretty regularly, so always have 35% kicking around) and I've used it in coffee when I'm out of everything else, but man, I don't like it.
Yep, been using it for about a decade to avoid sugar in diet. Also use it for all kinds of cooking (e.g., celeriac mash side dish, sauces, etc.).
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
Yep, been using it for about a decade to avoid sugar in diet. Also use it for all kinds of cooking (e.g., celeriac mash side dish, sauces, etc.).

I've gone to a monk fruit/stevia blend and 18% for my coffee for more or less the same reason. 35% is great for cooking though, absolutely. Love doing sauces with it.
 

BeLeafer

Well-known member
I've gone to a monk fruit/stevia blend and 18% for my coffee for more or less the same reason. 35% is great for cooking though, absolutely. Love doing sauces with it.
Monk fruit is a great sweeter, as is Erythritol. I have never had much of a sweet tooth and so have never used sugar or sweeters in my coffee. I used to drink it just black, but feel cream is easier on my gut.

Yeah, I love always having 35% cream around -- great for all kinds of things.

 

CH1

The Artist Formerly Known as chiggins.
18%??? That's what Timmy uses to disguise their low quality, stale industrial coffee beans.
 
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