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OT: Coronavirus Resources - and other things to not worry about

UWHabs

Well-known member
I don't blame people who like to work in an office - working from home is not for everyone, and for sure, if you have kids/pets/spouses at home that can complicate things. But for sure the world is seeing that some people really do like it, and that it really does make sense for a lot more people than it does now. I do wonder how many offices will be able to handle perhaps not 100% home or 100% office, but figure out how to strike a balance. Figure out how to set up an office so that people only go in 1-2 days a week, for example.

Or on the flipside, whether nomad-ism or pure remote work will see an uptick as well. Not that anyone wants to travel these days, but if you suddenly don't have to go into an office, why live in Toronto when you can live in a cheaper city?
 

worm

Well-known member
I think issue will arise when some ppl are working at home and some in the office

Not that those things cannot be overcome but it will take effort
 

trujaysfan

Well-known member
I don't blame people who like to work in an office - working from home is not for everyone, and for sure, if you have kids/pets/spouses at home that can complicate things. But for sure the world is seeing that some people really do like it, and that it really does make sense for a lot more people than it does now. I do wonder how many offices will be able to handle perhaps not 100% home or 100% office, but figure out how to strike a balance. Figure out how to set up an office so that people only go in 1-2 days a week, for example.

Or on the flipside, whether nomad-ism or pure remote work will see an uptick as well. Not that anyone wants to travel these days, but if you suddenly don't have to go into an office, why live in Toronto when you can live in a cheaper city?
I have several friends who are looking to move out of downtown. Some were thinking about it before but this was the big push. I live in burlington and work downtown/missisauga and would likely have gone further out if this had been forseen.
 

zeke

Well-known member
I don't blame people who like to work in an office - working from home is not for everyone, and for sure, if you have kids/pets/spouses at home that can complicate things. But for sure the world is seeing that some people really do like it, and that it really does make sense for a lot more people than it does now. I do wonder how many offices will be able to handle perhaps not 100% home or 100% office, but figure out how to strike a balance. Figure out how to set up an office so that people only go in 1-2 days a week, for example.

Or on the flipside, whether nomad-ism or pure remote work will see an uptick as well. Not that anyone wants to travel these days, but if you suddenly don't have to go into an office, why live in Toronto when you can live in a cheaper city?
Well only because some people actually like being able to walk over to any of thousands of cultural events at the drop of a hat.
 

anne25

Active member
Working from home may solve a problem for some but in most major cities if too many companies move to that option it could create other problems. Many smaller independent businesses depend on the noon hour and after work crown for their living.
 

WellPlayed

Well-known member
Well only because some people actually like being able to walk over to any of thousands of cultural events at the drop of a hat.
Ya I don't think major cities are going to die out or anything. There are still going to be tons of people who want to live where the action is. Events, food, culture, entertainment etc. etc.

It's just those who don't want to won't have to because of employment anymore. I loved living in Toronto for the couple years that I did, but I wouldn't go back. I need quiet, privacy, nature. My baseline stress is too high with everything going on in the city. It was a ton of fun though and I completely get people who wouldn't want to live anywhere else.

Myself, the older I get the more I want to live in the middle of nowhere but with the ability head to Toronto if the mood strikes. My next move hopefully takes me out of the GTA.

Actually come to think of it, I could see it being Toronto continuing to boom for those who want city life, a revitalization of small towns for those who want small town life, and the big losers being the GTA burb commuter cities like Mississauga, Brampton etc. who are stuck in the middle.

Great, I just bought a house in Oakville last year :(
 

worm

Well-known member
Working from home may solve a problem for some but in most major cities if too many companies move to that option it could create other problems. Many smaller independent businesses depend on the noon hour and after work crown for their living.
that is not really a problem

that is just a shift in where locate themselves
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
Working from home may solve a problem for some but in most major cities if too many companies move to that option it could create other problems. Many smaller independent businesses depend on the noon hour and after work crown for their living.
other the other side of that coin though, similar operators in the smaller towns/cities those workers move to, will boom.

I love a good shwarma shop as much as the next, but it's not really a concern when the other side of the equation is unlocking something in the range of 500 hours a year per person that is no longer stuck commuting.
 

zeke

Well-known member
Ya I don't think major cities are going to die out or anything. There are still going to be tons of people who want to live where the action is. Events, food, culture, entertainment etc. etc.

It's just those who don't want to won't have to because of employment anymore. I loved living in Toronto for the couple years that I did, but I wouldn't go back. I need quiet, privacy, nature. My baseline stress is too high with everything going on in the city. It was a ton of fun though and I completely get people who wouldn't want to live anywhere else.

Myself, the older I get the more I want to live in the middle of nowhere but with the ability head to Toronto if the mood strikes.

Actually come to think of it, I could see it being Toronto continuing to boom for those who want city life, a revitalization of small towns for those who want small town life, and the big losers being the GTA burb commuter cities like Mississauga, Brampton etc. who are stuck in the middle.

Great, I just bought a house in Oakville last year :(
Oh I'm with you the older you get the better the peace and quiet of nature gets.

I haven't perfectedby balance of downtown vs out in the forest quite yet but i'm getting there.
 

MindzEye

Wayward Ditch Pig
Oh I'm with you the older you get the better the peace and quiet of nature gets.

I haven't perfectedby balance of downtown vs out in the forest quite yet but i'm getting there.
The real answer here is to push all levels of governments to put money into building real regional rail travel. There's no good reason why someone can't choose to live in a decent sized town within 50-70km of Union station and not be able to get there by train for events, attractions, entertainment within an hour and with a decent schedule.

Basically take Go and put it on steroids.
 

LeafGm

Well-known member
I’m kind of greedy. I want everything that living downtown gives you access to, but I also want a place out in the country to escape to.

What I am definitely done with is the suburbs, though. Spent my first 24-25 years there, and it really is the worst of both worlds. Crowded enough that you don’t have a ton of privacy, quiet or feel like you’re out in the country while also having nothing really interesting any closer than an hour+ drive or ride on public transit.
 

LeafGm

Well-known member
Yeah, I know the area well. I was on the border of Richmond Hill/Thornhill.

Just an endless sprawl of cookie-cutter subdivisions built on paved-over forests & farmland, nothing of note within walking distance, ridiculous traffic, non-existent public transit and the same "Smart Centre" plaza with the same stores and chain restaurants at the corner of every major intersection.
 

Bleedsblue&white

Well-known member
I have no desire to drive downtown, other than that I feel like you can have your cake and eat it to...I work in Vaughan, live in a quiet place and I only need 45 minutes on the best days, hour 15 on bad...as long as I'm gone early Fridays.

Now once you're on the 401 and everything south of it....
 

CH1

The Artist Formerly Known as chiggins.
I don’t need a big city anymore (but could use one about an hour away for the occasional concert or other cultural happening)

But what I do need is the ability to have a bunch of food purveyors (butcher, bakery, veggies) within walking distance.

The other thing about a big city like Toronto is that it makes shitty weather somewhat bearable. The allure of a big backyard ends in November every year for 6 months.

Put me in California, Oregon, Texas, etc and I’m sure I can find a small town with a lot to offer. But in Canada, I don’t know where to look.
 

Preston

Well-known member
Woodbridge/Vaughan are probably close the absolute bottom in places I'd like to live in the gta. I work in Vaughan and I'm pretty sure I can fucking get there faster by walking. Their urban planning is mother fucking maddening. I'm in northern Richmond Hill which is quite nice for now. When I first bought the place it was probably too quiet of an area for me but now it has a nice balance of quiet and busy. Drive three minutes and I'm in farmland. Walk 5 minutes and I have 5000 bakeries, butchers and grocery stores. It isn't perfect but that's all I need.

I couldn't do downtown Toronto or anywhere quieter than this. The salient point is that there really is no perfect place. Big time pros and cons to every place really but based on my own personality I can't imagine living anywhere else in Ontario. Although I could imagine moving back to Europe one day...
 

Deckie007

Well-known member
It looks like I'm going to be permanently locating my place of employment from Etobicoke to Milton. As much as I adore Port Credit, I'm not sure I will want to do a 40 minute commute every day down the QEW/401 when the traffic patterns get closer to normal. WFH isn't going to be an option most of the time, so I'm in a bit of a quandry of whether to relocate to a place more in the country (which I'd prefer) or just swallow the commute and fuel / wear and tear on my vehicle.
 

Aberdeen

Well-known member
I'm in the Wortley Village area of London. London has got a lot of shittiness, but I really like our area. Charming old homes, very active and social community. Shops and restaurants within walking distance. When I lived in Toronto I was always positive I needed a big city, but I've definitely changed with age. Also having lived in several cities in Canada and Scotland, I've come to realize most places are what you make of them.
 

Preston

Well-known member
I'm in the Wortley Village area of London. London has got a lot of shittiness, but I really like our area. Charming old homes, very active and social community. Shops and restaurants within walking distance. When I lived in Toronto I was always positive I needed a big city, but I've definitely changed with age. Also having lived in several cities in Canada and Scotland, I've come to realize most places are what you make of them.
Yeah I know a lotttttt of people with depression who thought moving would make them happy. Spoiler: it didn't. At the end of the day, as you said, most places are what you make of them. They almost all have positives and negatives. No such thing as a perfect place.
 
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